Native to Mexico, Sedum nussbaumerianum, also known by its common names Coppertone Stonecrop, Nussbaumer’s Sedum, and Golden Sedum are low growing perennial with pretty rosettes. The leaves are plump and long, with colors ranging from light yellowish-green in the shade to coppery-orange in full sun. The stems tend to sprawl out and spill out of the pot when mature. They produce round clusters of white flowers that are lightly fragrant. These plants are drought and heat tolerant.

Place in a bright location indoors, anywhere where there is plenty of light. Try an east facing window. A south and west facing window may also work but you may need to move the plant around a few times to find the best spot. If the plant starts to suffer from lack of light, move to a brighter location. You would know by how the plant is growing. If it starts stretching out and become leggy, that means the plant is not getting enough light. This process is called etiolation. The plant is literally seeking more light. This produces weak and stunted growth.

To keep them really happy, they need approximately 4-6 hours of bright light per day. These plants will not tolerate poor lighting for prolonged periods of time. If your indoor space does not receive adequate lighting no matter where you move the plant, consider using a grow light. Grow lights can help supplement your plants’ lighting requirements especially during those long, dark winters. 

Like any other succulent plant, Sedum nussbaumerianum ‘Coppertone Stonecrop’ needs well-draining soil. The right type of soil goes hand in hand with proper watering. I have been using a simple, tried and tested mixture that has worked well for my plants. I use a cactus potting mix combined with perlite for added drainage. I do not use exact measurements but eyeball it to about 2:1 solution of cactus mix and perlite (You can increase the perlite to 1:1 solution if you live in a humid location). You can also consider making a sandy soil, which adds more drainage to the mix. This can be achieved by mixing cactus mix or potting soil with coarse sand (about 2:1 ratio). Or you can use a combination of the three materials mentioned: Cactus mix, perlite, coarse sand (1:1:1).

Watering largely depends on the climate you live in. Although these plants are highly adapted to dry weather conditions, they thrive when given sufficient amounts of water, but not too much. There really isn’t a set schedule or formula on when to water succulents. 

 

One good way to tell whether it’s time to water is to check the moisture of the soil. The top inch of the soil needs to feel dry before you can water again. If you are unsure how much and how often to water in the beginning, it’s always better to underwater and increase watering as needed. Pay attention to how your plant looks and you can adjust watering accordingly.

SEDUM COPPERTONE 4in

$10.00Price

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